Stash busting (Gertie Pencil Skirt)

Stash busting (Gertie Pencil Skirt)

Real awkward posing this time, sorry.
Real awkward posing this time, sorry.

As I’ve already mentioned 283473987 times, I recently moved, which means I recently packed up all my fabric. Whoa. It’s insane how much fabric I have, that I’ve already used for other projects, with more than a yard remaining. Perhaps I should reevaluate my policy of always buying 4 yards, but…who am I kidding with that nonsense. Extra fabric is always a good thing!

Not pregnant, just like snacks.
Not pregnant, just like snacks.

Faced with the daunting task of moving all that extra fabric, I decided to stitch up a few things. Fabric is easier to move once it becomes a garment, in my crazy mind. Realizing that I also desperately need work wear, I landed pretty quick on pencil skirts from Gertie’s first book. I know I’ve been sewing a ton of her shit lately, but this really is my go-to pencil skirt. It’s crazy fast, doesn’t use much fabric, and I already have the pattern traced. Her newest book also has a pencil skirt, but tracing that was an extra step I just wasn’t prepared for, you know?

Yeah I realize that black shirt is too tight, shut up. Also, check out that sweet lazy eye.

I actually made three of these, but one of them is in the laundry, so you’ll just have to visualize it. Each skirt took about a yard of fabric. The first is stretch twill, leftover from my frankenpattern dress, which actually uses the pencil skirt pattern, no creative leaps here. The black is a poly stretch twill from Mood, leftover from my unblogged Sewaholic Robson trench. Third is the unphotographed blue satin, with fabric left over from my Nita wrap skirt.

Unflattering back view.
Unflattering back view.

Gertie gives you two options with this skirt waistband, interfacing or boning. I opted for the interfacing, simply because it’s quicker. I don’t enjoy sewing garments for work, so I really wanted to power through these quickly. If I remember correctly, the instructions are fairly easy to follow, but I honestly haven’t used them in ages. These stitched up in around an hour apiece, seriously simple sewing here. I cut a size four, I think, and the fight is tight, exactly how I wanted them. Definitely make sure your fabric has a decent amount of give, though. If not, more ease will keep you from an embarassing wardrobe malfunction! In the end, I needed work skirts, and these definitely fit the bill. I’m naming this a success stashing busting session, happy sewing 🙂

6 thoughts on “Stash busting (Gertie Pencil Skirt)

  1. I like the black shirt as well as the black and white paisley. Is the high waistband comfortable? What happens after sitting in this a while? I could see the waistband creasing on me and having a line there then when I walked around in it. Maybe the interfacing helps? Looks great from the back.

    1. It actually is, the fabric has a decent bit of stretch, so it’s not constricting. On the black skirt, the fabric is a bit less sturdy, and it does crease a bit. Interfacing does help! It adds structure, think of shirt collars and cuffs.

  2. I’ve been far up Gertie’s ass lately too. Which is funny because I was so pissy about the fit of her patterns. I guess it’s a good thing I’ve learned how to fit myself better. That said, I made this skirt when I was a newbie and it was STUPID easy. Great pattern! Yours look great and <3 our whole frakenpattern day… we rocked!

  3. Great skirts, they look great and fit so well. It’s feels fab to use up odd leftovers, I like your buy 4 yards policy I might need to adopt it.

    1. This pattern is really on point for me, as far as sizing and fit go. I swear it helps if you don’t have a pattern in mind!! I used to do 3, but it wasn’t enough for some of the dresses with fuller skirts.

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